Neat new feature in Rust…

A few years ago, I decided to try my hand at the Advent of Code problems in Rust, as a way to help me learn the language. One of the things I like to do in Rust (which I also liked to do in Python) is make heavy use of iterators, so when I come up against a problem like this, I reach for them first!

Unfortunately, creating an iterator in Rust is kind of a pain in the butt. Fortunately, Rust lets you write macros to help smooth off some of the rough edges, so I took at stab at it, and talked to my co-worker Nika about it, and she eventually wrote this, which was a lot of help!

But recently Rust has introduced a couple of new features, and the one that caught my eye in particular was std::iter::from_fn, which let’s you make an iterator from a function, which is most of what that macro was trying to do, so I thought I would try to convert the various places I was using the macro to use the new function instead…

The first one I tried converting was FactorsIter, an iterator of arrays of factors of the integers. It looked like like this:

define_iterator!(FactorsIter (
    &curr: usize = 1
  ) -> Option<HashSet<usize>> {

  let mut factors = HashSet::new();
  let upper_limit = (*curr as f64).sqrt() as usize + 1;
  for i in 1..upper_limit {
    if *curr % i == 0 {
      factors.insert(i);
      factors.insert(*curr / i);
    }
  }
  *curr += 1;
  Some(factors)
});
//…
    for (i, factors) in FactorsIter::default().enumerate() {

and turned into something like this:

fn factors_iter() -> impl Iterator<Item = HashSet<usize>> {
    let mut curr: usize = 1;

    std::iter::from_fn(move || {
        let mut factors = HashSet::new();
        let upper_limit = (curr as f64).sqrt() as usize + 1;
        for i in 1..upper_limit {
            if curr % i == 0 {
                factors.insert(i);
                factors.insert(curr / i);
            }
        }
        curr += 1;
        Some(factors)
    })
}
// …
    for (i, factors) in factors_iter().enumerate() {

Not a huge change, but it does read a little nicer to me.

The next one was the HundredIter, which took a number of ingredients, and returned each combination of them that would add up to 100 total items. It started off as:

define_iterator!(HundredIter (
    &curr: Vec<i32> = vec![],
    &max: i32 = 100,
    &len: usize = 0
  ) -> Option<Vec<i32>> {

  let curr_len = *len - 1;
  if curr.is_empty() {
    for _ in 0..curr_len {
      curr.push(0)
    }
  } else {
    curr[curr_len - 1] += 1;
  }

  if curr[0] == *max {
    return None;
  }

  let mut rest: i32 = *max - curr.iter().sum::<i32>();

  let mut found = false;
  while rest < 0 {
    for i in 1..curr_len {
      if curr[curr_len - i] != 0 {
        found = true;
        curr[curr_len - i] = 0;
        curr[curr_len - i - 1] += 1;
        break;
      }
    }
    if !found {
      break;
    }
    rest = *max - curr.iter().sum::<i32>();
  }
  if !found && rest < 0 {
    None
  } else {
    let mut rv = curr.clone();
    rv.push(rest);

    Some(rv)
  }
});

which is fine, I guess, but not great. It ended up as:

fn hundred_iter(len: usize) -> impl Iterator<Item = Vec<i32>> {
    let mut curr: Vec<i32> = vec![];
    const MAX: i32 = 100;
    let curr_len: usize = len - 1;

    std::iter::from_fn(move || {
        if curr.is_empty() {
            for _ in 0..curr_len {
                curr.push(0)
            }
        } else {
            curr[curr_len - 1] += 1;
        }

        if curr[0] == MAX {
            return None;
        }

        let mut rest: i32 = MAX - curr.iter().sum::<i32>();

        let mut found = false;
        while rest < 0 {
            for i in 1..curr_len {
                if curr[curr_len - i] != 0 {
                    found = true;
                    curr[curr_len - i] = 0;
                    curr[curr_len - i - 1] += 1;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if !found {
                break;
            }
            rest = MAX - curr.iter().sum::<i32>();
        }
        if !found && rest < 0 {
            None
        } else {
            let mut rv = curr.clone();
            rv.push(rest);

            Some(rv)
        }
    })
}

which seems a lot better. I mean, the code itself is almost identical (the main difference being we don’t have any weird *s hanging around), but it’s much clearer which parts of the signature are supposed to be parameters, and which are variables that we use to keep track of state!

Calling it is much nicer, too, going from:

    let iter = HundredIter {
        len: ingredients.len() as usize,
        ..Default::default()
    };

to the much more obvious:

    let iter = hundred_iter(ingredients.len());

😃

Oh, and here’s the new version of the gist above. It’s not a huge change, but it’s a little simpler, and feels a little more Rust-y to me.

Comments

Comments powered by Disqus